Science Shows We Can No Longer Justify Our Poor Treatment of Animals

Do animals suffer? Do animals know who they are? Do animals enjoy a good meal? Do animals think about what they will do next? Intuitively, you would likely answer yes, of course animals feel and think! Spend one day with a dog or watch a mother cow with her young and you would be hard pressed to deny them these basic emotional and cognitive capacities.

But deny them we have. While, on one level, we know that animals can suffer and can enjoy things in life like we do, on another level, we try to dismiss these capacities in order to justify our use of animals in ways that cause them tremendous suffering. Often enough, that justification has come from scientists who have argued that non-human animals lack sentience and/or cognitive sophistication. By suggesting that animals do not have the ability to feel or think, these arguments provided what was needed for many to deny animals any moral relevance.

It is science, ironically, which is now proving this viewpoint to be wrong. There is now an explosion of studies and insights by notable scientists such as Frans de Waal, Michael Tomasello, Marc Bekoff, Sue Savage-Rumbaugh and Jaak Panksepp examining the mental lives of animals (how they think and feel). These studies reveal that most animals experience a wide range of emotional and cognitive capacities that were previously denied to them.

Read the full article in the Dodo