Other Select Writings

New paper published: The Flaws and Human Harms of Animal Experimentation

Abstract: Nonhuman animal (“animal”) experimentation is typically defended by arguments that it is reliable, that animals provide sufficiently good models of human biology and dis- eases to yield relevant information, and that, consequently, its use provides major human health benefits. I demonstrate that a growing body of scientific literature critically assessing the validity of animal experimentation generally (and animal modeling specifically) raises important concerns about its reliability and predictive value for human outcomes and for understanding human physiology. The unreliability of animal experimentation across a wide range of areas undermines scientific arguments in favor of the practice. Additionally, I show how animal experimentation often significantly harms humans through misleading safety studies, potential abandonment of effective therapeutics, and direction of resources away from more effective testing methods. The resulting evidence suggests that the collective harms and costs to humans from animal experimentation outweigh potential benefits and that resources would be better invested in developing human-based testing methods.

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Oxford Centre’s New Report On the Ethics of Animal Experimentation

The drafting of this report included Dr Akhtar and other leading ethicists and scientists. The working party concluded that animal experiments are both morally and scientifically flawed. The report of more than 50,000 words is probably the most comprehensive critique of animal experiments ever published.

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Suffering for Science and How Supports the End of Animal Experimentation

Upcoming book chapter in: Handbook of Practical Animal Ethics (publication pending)

The Complexity of Animal Awareness

Book Chapter In: Linzey A (eds). The Global Guide to Animal Protection. University of Illinois Press, 2013.

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Animals and Public Health

Book Chapter In: Linzey A (eds). The Global Guide to Animal Protection. University of Illinois Press, 2013.

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Photo: Farm Sanctuary

The Need to Include Animal Protection in Public Health Policies

Many critical public health issues require non-traditional approaches. Although many novel strategies are used, one approach not widely applied involves improving the treatment of animals. Emerging infectious diseases are pressing public health challenges that could benefit from improving the treatment of animals. Other human health issues, that overlap with animal treatment issues, and that warrant further exploration, are medical research and domestic violence. The diverse nature of these health issues and their connection with animal treatment suggest that there may be other similar intersections. Public health would benefit by including the treatment of animals as a topic of study and policy development.

Read the full article: Journal of Public Health Policy